Bullfighting

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Re: Bullfighting

Post by C-Mag » Sat Nov 18, 2017 2:58 pm

Montegriffo wrote:
President Donald Trump said in a tweet on Friday he is putting a decision to allow imports of elephant trophies on hold after a torrent of criticism from conservation advocates and across social media.

Trump’s reversal came hours after his administration released a rule on Friday to allow hunters who kill elephants in Zimbabwe to bring their trophies back to the United States, which had been banned by the Obama administration.
You want to see the extinction of the African elephant?
Absolutely :twisted:

Unfortunately I love hunting and trophy hunting saves animals from extinction. So we'll just have to go on tolerating Pachyderms. :lol:
https://www.hoover.org/research/how-hun ... es-animals
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by Montegriffo » Sat Nov 18, 2017 3:26 pm

C-Mag wrote:
Montegriffo wrote:
President Donald Trump said in a tweet on Friday he is putting a decision to allow imports of elephant trophies on hold after a torrent of criticism from conservation advocates and across social media.

Trump’s reversal came hours after his administration released a rule on Friday to allow hunters who kill elephants in Zimbabwe to bring their trophies back to the United States, which had been banned by the Obama administration.
You want to see the extinction of the African elephant?
Absolutely :twisted:

Unfortunately I love hunting and trophy hunting saves animals from extinction. So we'll just have to go on tolerating Pachyderms. :lol:
https://www.hoover.org/research/how-hun ... es-animals
Trophy hunting does no such thing, it merely lines the pockets of corrupt African regimes.
Besides which more money is generated by people wishing to see live elephants in their natural environment than trophy hunting.
Populations dropped 30% between 2007 - 2014.
But conservation advocates say that elephants bring in much more revenue from tourists who want to see them alive. A report from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust estimates that an elephant brings in $23,000 a year, or $1.6 million over its lifetime.

Animal advocates also say that hunting endangered species is unethical and shouldn't be used to generate money for the government.

"It's impossible to sustainably harvest a species that's declining," Sebastian Troeng, executive vice president of Conservation International said. "The notion that killing elephants is helping elephants doesn't hold water."
http://abcnews.go.com/US/hunting-elepha ... d=51194213
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by C-Mag » Sat Nov 18, 2017 3:34 pm

The government will protect the animals when they have a financial interest in it. Advocates say all kinds of wild shit. Actual numbers of $$$ revenue paid to the government can be counted.

Stossel has been Woke on this for years
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by Montegriffo » Sat Nov 18, 2017 3:42 pm

Safari tourism brings in vastly more money. They are worth more alive than dead.
More of the tourism money goes to the local communities who then have a vested interest in protecting the wildlife. Giving money to African governments so that Gucci Grace Mugabe can go to Harrods on a shopping spree helps no one.
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by C-Mag » Sat Nov 18, 2017 3:48 pm

Montegriffo wrote:Safari tourism brings in vastly more money. They are worth more alive than dead.
More of the tourism money goes to the local communities who then have a vested interest in protecting the wildlife. Giving money to African governments so that Gucci Grace Mugabe can go to Harrods on a shopping spree helps no one.

Numbers or it's just a warm feeling.

Europeans are reintroducing Aurochs and Bison, and it's frickin Awesome.
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by Montegriffo » Sat Nov 18, 2017 4:17 pm

C-Mag wrote:
Montegriffo wrote:Safari tourism brings in vastly more money. They are worth more alive than dead.
More of the tourism money goes to the local communities who then have a vested interest in protecting the wildlife. Giving money to African governments so that Gucci Grace Mugabe can go to Harrods on a shopping spree helps no one.

Numbers or it's just a warm feeling.
http://www.endangeredspecieshandbook.or ... ourism.php
The irony of the slaughter of elephants and other large mammals for trophies is that the funds accrued from trophy hunting or ivory are miniscule in comparison to the value of these animals as ecotourist drawing cards. In Kenya, a 1989 analysis on the viewing value of elephants found that between $25 and $30 million per year was earned in tourist dollars from people attracted to the elephants alone (Brody 1994). A new project provides a local Maasai tribe with about $23,000 a year from tour operators who camp there primarily to show visitors the big bull elephants that are now so rare in East Africa (Brody 1994). During the long life of an African Elephant, it may produce tourist revenue worth $1 million, distributed to a wide range of recipients, from airlines to travel companies, and to local economies (Currey and Moore 1994). By contrast, a trophy-hunted elephant brings a one-time fee of $4,000 to $20,000. Estimates for African Lions are similar. A fully maned male Lion, according to Lee Durrell (1986) in State of the Ark, is worth $500,000 as a tourist attraction, whereas a Lion shot for sport or trophy is worth between $3,500 and $8,500, and its skin about $1,000.
https://www.ifaw.org/sites/default/file ... estion.pdf
Trophy hunting advocates present the industry as large, citing figures such as $200m in annual
revenue. But in the context of national economies, the industry is tiny, contributing
at best
a
fraction of a percent of GDP.
Nature based tourism does play a
significant role in national
development,
but trophy hunting is insignificant. Across the investigated countries, trophy
hunting revenue was only
1.8%
of tourism revenues
http://www.africanindaba.com/2017/02/th ... lume-15-1/
The report concludes that hunting brings in just 0.78 percent or less of the overall tourism spending and has only a marginal impact on employment in Botswana, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe, providing approximately 0.76 percent or less of overall tourism jobs. The total economic contribution of is at most an estimated 0.03 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), the HSI report said.
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... e-namibia/

According to an IUCN report, the sport hunting industry does not provide significant benefits to the communities where it occurs. Across Africa, there are only about 15,000 hunting-related jobs—a tiny number, especially considering that the six main game-hunting countries alone have a population of nearly 150 million.

Besides that, local communities make an average of only ten cents a hectare (25 cents an acre) from trophy hunting. A return that small, the report says, explains locals’ “lack of interest in preserving hunting areas and their continued encroachment and poaching.”

With more than one-sixth of the land in those six countries set aside for trophy hunting, and the fact that land-hungry politicians are seizing more and more land for themselves, impoverished rural communities often resort to poaching and the illegal wildlife trade to sustain themselves.
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael- ... 55186.html
Are these animals worth more to local economies alive or dead? One African conservationist estimated that eco-tourists from just one lodge paid more in a week to take pictures of Cecil than the $55,000 that Palmer spent to put the lion’s head on his trophy wall. Over his lifetime, a living Cecil could have brought in $1 million in tourism.

https://africageographic.com/blog/troph ... e-reality/
Over the last few months, wildlife biologists and conservationists have found themselves taking sides – for or against the trophy hunting industry. Many conservationists, such as myself, are against the trophy hunting of endangered and vulnerable species, not because of animal welfare reasons but because of the failure of this activity to fulfil its role in conservation. In the majority of the arguments put forth by conservationists in its favour, the term “trophy hunting” has often been found alongside the words “potential tool” and “if well done”. However, the reality shows that in practice in some countries, it is just an activity to fuel corruption, encourage the unfair redistribution of the wealth generated, inadequate involvement of communities and the loss of healthy individuals that are still key for reproduction.

We are often brainwashed about the role of trophy hunting as a conservation tool. It is presented to us as a magic bullet for conservation efforts in African countries where hunting is allowed.

It is true that in some areas, conservationists work alongside hunters and some hunting clubs donate large amounts of money to NGOs. However, these initiatives that started off with good intentions are often, over time, diluted by corruption and loss of interest. “Campfire” in Zimbabwe is a prime example – what started off with good intentions and was successful in its goals for a few years, collapsed in its purpose and today is heavily subsidised by the government.
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by Fife » Sat Nov 18, 2017 4:23 pm

Obviously, it's time to get these lawless Africans snapped to attention towards the law.

Go get em Montez.

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Re: Bullfighting

Post by Speaker to Animals » Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:44 am


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Re: Bullfighting

Post by C-Mag » Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:11 am

@ Monte, not ignoring your references, I will take a look at them later.



Bull Horn in the Nutsack! Ouch.
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Re: Bullfighting

Post by DrYouth » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:40 pm

How often do you get to see a factory farm cow express itself this way.

Sure the bull gets eaten in the end... but at least it gets its day of glory before it becomes beefsteak.
Deep down tho, I still thirst to kill you and eat you. Ultra Chimp can't help it.. - Smitty